2017-11-02: Gas tank – part 1

I suspect there will be many parts to this series…

After much debate, we decided to go with an externally mounted, refillable gas  tank. This one came from Gasit in the UK, and it’s about 20 litres.

The gas fittings look reasonably straightforward, given that we’ve not done this sort of thing before, but we’ve already hit our first snag, which is that the space under the chassis where this tank is designed to be mounted is slightly different to most, so the standard mounting brackets won’t fit. So we’re having some steel angles fabricated to provide secure mounting points. More on this to come.

The space where we’re mounting the tank, and measurements for the custom angles we need to get made up.

In the meantime, we’re preparing the tank to be fitted, by spraying it with a coating of Underbody Seal paint, which is pretty gross stuff, but apparently should protect it from chips and dirt that’s thrown up off the road. Many more challenges on this front to come, I’m sure.

Spraying the gas tank with Underbody Seal paint
The strange tacky, textured tarry finish

2017-10-29: Recognisable furniture

Some things in the van that look a bit like furniture!

This weekend, we’ve made some satisfying progress in the van, with a few new things going in that make it look a lot more like a home.

The two base units that form the support for the bed are largely complete, bar a few doors. That means we have a functioning bed, a bench seat, and some fixed storage too.

We ordered some foam for the mattress, which we’ve chopped up and covered in stockinette (a stretchy, loosely-woven lining that protects the foam and helps a mattress cover slide over it).

Amy sewing stockinette linings over the foam mattress sections

We also ordered some table legs, and we’ve been trying out different methods for supporting the table top, and making the conversion from bed to bench + table manageable.

And we also have one more piece of finished furniture installed – the overhead cabinets on the passenger side (above the bench), made out of birch ply, with doors supported on gas struts, and a felt lining on the inside of the cabinet.

The gas struts hold the cabinet doors both open and closed, which means no need for latches.

In a way, the van looks quite similar to the state it was in back in August, but this is one iteration on, with mistakes corrected for, some lessons learned and everything that much more well-considered.

2017-10-19: Overhead shelf in the cab

One of the first jobs we did after we bought the van was to remove the bulkhead. We toyed with the idea of joining the cab area to the back of the van by installing swivel seats, but that’s an expensive conversion, and we liked the idea of having what amounts to a separate room in the cab. Our current plan is to have a ‘soft divide’ – likely some kind of insulating curtain, that we can draw across behind the seats, and otherwise leave the cab pretty much standard.

However, there’s a lot of vertical space above the seats that we wanted to make use of, so we fitted a shelf, faced with a wall at the back that forms a partial bulkhead above our heads.

Shelf as seen from the back of the van, with stuff holes for duvets and pillows

The shelf is made from 9mm hardwood ply, and it’s supported at the front and sides on oak battens, which are bolted onto existing attachment points on the cab body.

We used oak because these supporting battens have to take a significant weight, and softwood wouldn’t be up to the task. Also, we knew the frame would be visible, so we wanted something that looked good. Fortunately, the particular plywood we’re using here, while not the high-grade birch ply, does have one nice face, which matches the oak quite well.

Oak support frame underneath the shelf

The shelf is supported by the back by the partial bulkhead, made of 12mm birch ply, which itself hangs from bolts rivnutted to the frame of the van.

We intend to use this area to stuff in bedding when our bed is not in use, so the large cavernous space is idea. We don’t need to worry about things rolling about, and all we had to do to provide access was cut a couple of large stuff holes, with rounded edges (using a roundover bit on the router).

On the passenger side, we also mounted our MT-50 solar controller monitor, which gives us some live info on the state of the battery, power draw, and the performance of the panels.